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For many creatives, coming up with an idea or a new course, isn’t the challenge. Executing it is!

But, this is what makes offering your audience a pre-sale strategy so brilliant. It’s a low-risk way to gauge interest while holding yourself accountable.

Remember: “A pre-sale is a targeted sale before your product actually goes live. You sell the idea of your course to a small portion of your audience before you’ve created all of your course content.”

Even if you’re not feeling creatively inspired or aren’t sure of what specifically you’d like to cover in your course, a pre-sale can be a great way to explore a lead or gain clarity on what type of content would best serve your audience.

As said by Elisabeth Larson Koehler “A pre-sale can give a nice boost in income before even starting your course,”

Start before you’re ready!

With a pre-sale strategy, you sell your course before you’ve created your course content.
Going through this process lights a fire under you because you have to get something done,
A pre-sale helps eliminate wasting time on things that you don’t know that you’re wasting time with, especially when you’re new to course creation.

It teaches you how to be really lean with your time, use the resources that you have, and really get to the essence of what you’re teaching—and deliver that to people.

Remember it’s not about you!

While there are obvious advantages to pre-sales on the creator’s end (saving time, earning instantly, and getting clear on course direction), pre-sales also offer your students value and a course tailored to their needs.

Selling a course before its complete might feel uncomfortable and counterintuitive. However, it’s actually a way to meet your students where they’re at, rather than where you think they’re at.

Additionally, consider adding an incentive to your pre-sale strategy, such as early access or a discount, in exchange for feedback. It’s a win-win for you and your students.

Balance structure with flexibility!


Like any good teacher knows, it’s good to have a lesson plan in place, while being prepared to adjust accordingly.

You can start with an outline of what you want your course to look like but should be prepared to modify as you receive feedback.

Conclusion:
Putting yourself out there might always feel uncomfortable. And, adopting a pre-sale strategy might amplify those feelings because you lack concrete content ready to push out. But ultimately, surrendering your plans to the needs of your students can lead to a more impactful learning—and selling—experience.

Reach out to us if you want us to plan an effective pre-sales strategy for your course! We not only help you create  pre-sales strategy but also provide you a platform to conduct your courses on!